What is Easter?

Ask a three-year-old raised in a non-religious household “What is Easter?” and you get pretty much what you’d expect, especially if she’s clutching the headless 12″ chocolate rabbit Nana brought her, methodically munching her way down his torso.

It’s Easter egg hunts…..(chomp) and candy….(thoughtful chewing) And the Easter Bunny. Where is the Easter Bunny?

Easter embodied in the Chocolate Bunny.

More than that, my granddaughter will likely think of Easter when she hears the fire truck go by, and may, through the slip of the tongue, refer to the Fire Bunny rather than the Easter Bunny. All of this is to be expected, when the fire department hosts the annual Easter Egg hunt at the local park and the sound that heralds the beginning of the egg hunt is a protracted blast of the firetruck’s siren.

I grew up in a fairly religious family. I now like to think of us as Public Presbyterians, our family’s worship having been more community-based rather than faith-based, though I’m pretty sure my Mom was more spiritual than the other four of us put together. We spent a lot of our youth in Sunday School in the basement of the large First Presbyterian Church in Greensburg, PA, learning about Jesus, of course, but more importantly, painting small shards of glass with window paint to reassemble them into little stained glass sculptures. I also “assisted” my mother when she chaired the church fair, with little tables in the basement filled with home made crafts like these that were sold to raise money. I attended Brownies, and Girl Scouts in the same church basement. I have a faint recollection of the youth paster calling me “BeElzebub” which was only a short distance from the usual bastardization of my name by people, Elsbeth not being a common name. Hmmm. Perhaps that’s why I now call myself “Els.” Be Elz a Bub.

I associate Easter with my vestments of Easter, one year the pretty light-weight aquamarine wool coat with silky frog closures that I wore to the Easter service when I was about eight. I remember the Easter Bunny coming to deliver a basket of candy to me when I went to Florida with my Mom to stay with her parents in their condo when I was about six. I remember being very impressed that he was able to find me all the way down there. I also associate it with community, as the entire congregation was invited to Mrs. Boetticher’s house for brunch following the service on Easter Sunday. Gazelle Boetticher was a lovely Methodist minister’s widow, who, in addition to hosting this chaotic lunch, also baked birthday cakes throughout the year for all the children who attended. I don’t remember a lot about her, other than her extensive spoon and plate collection, which decorated the walls of her dining room, and the warm circle of church members who celebrated this holiday with her.

Easter was tangible for me in a way that it is for most small children, I imagine. The anticipation of the hunt, the glory of the prize of finding eggs stuffed with candy. Dyeing the eggs is a ritual I feel lucky to have learned. There is always at least the one lost egg which turns up with a spectacular reek a week or so after Easter. My daughter-in-law is smart about this, and has her daughter hide the eggs outside, where any lost eggs will merely feed the many members of the animal kingdom.

The thing about three year olds (as well as fifty-nine-year-olds), is they aren’t very clever about hiding Easter eggs. This is probably just as well, because they also aren’t very good at remembering where they hid the eggs. And when the game is both hide and seek, this is a useful shortcoming. Makes it more fun.

Aside from any religious aspect, Easter is fun. It’s especially fun if you have a brand new grand baby to meet over Easter weekend, which I did. Talk about a boost! Babies are redemptive.

First photo of Nana with Gdaughter 2.

Babies provide us with the lens to see the good, the vulnerable, to bring out the kindness and compassion that our modern society seems so desperately to want to squash. Traveling to the mountains, separated from the internet, nothing but family to focus on is centering and quelling of the worldly chaos I know I’ve physically internalized. Even when the exercise occasionally turns to the quelling of three-year-old tantrums, it is still soul-refilling.

Easter means redemption to many of a more Christian stripe than I. And there is no greater season of hopeful redemption than the first months of widowhood. Even the atheistic griever must confess to the willing suspension of disbelief that our partner or spouse will rise again from the dead, push aside the rock separating them from us, and reunite with us. Lingering on this path, however, is the way to insanity, I’ve come to realize.

Not surprisingly, I find myself thinking a lot about death lately. I’ve removed the WeCroak App from my phone after a particularly graphic quote startled me away. I guess my loss is recent enough that five daily reminders that we will die isn’t yet restorative or comforting. I’ve gravitated to dinners and theatre outings with my also-recent widows and widowers, but recognize that this desire to be helpful in others’ healing ironically may be holding me back from my own. As the semester ended yesterday, I realized I would no longer have the artificial buzz of the work hive to sustain my attentions, and that I would need to dig deeper to discover and re-discover what it is that I want to spend my time on. Just as the mountain snows’ melting reveal summer’s tools left behind, the passing days of solitude reveal the work still to be done.

Time to heft the Collins axe once again.

5 Replies to “What is Easter?”

  1. SO THOROUGHLY APPRECIATED YOUR eEASTER MEMORIES..YOUR FATHER’S AND MY DAY THEN WAS FILLED WITH HUNTING FOR JELLY BEANS THAT OUR WONDERFUL MOTHER CLEVERLY HID IN NOOKS AND CRANNIES ALL OVER OUR FIRST FLOOR  HOME ON 306 GOODWIN AVENUE,,,   MANY WEEKS LATER WE WOULD FIND A JELLY BEAN HIDDEN TOO WELL….

    THIS HAS BEEN SO DIFFICULT A TIME FOR YOU DEAR ELS….WE TOO ARE ROUNDING THE CORNER FOR SLIPPING AWAY FROM OUR EARTHLY LOVED ONES….WE HAVE GREAT JOY IN AS MUCH AS WE CAN……GOING TO VISIT DON AND SALLY ON THE 11TH OF MAY…YOUR FATHER INVITED US TO CELEBRATE MY 83RD ON MAY 14,,,,WOW,,WE HAVE SO MANY GIGGLES YET TO SURFACE AND WARM LASTING HUGS TO WRAP AROUND EACH DEAR ONE,,,LIFE IS SUCH A GIFT,,,,WE ARE VERY THANKFUL OF OUR BLESSINGS AS ARE YOU!!!!  LOVE RENIE…P.S i WROTE A SONG ABOUT THE WHALES,,,POOR DEARS,,,WHO EAT OUR THROW AWAY PLASTICS DAILY…PATHETIC MESS WE HUMANS HAVE CREATED FOR ALL CREATURES OF THE OCEANS,….

    1. Dear Renie,
      Thanks for sharing your Easter memories, too. Glad you’ll be together with Dad and Sally for Easter. I’ll be sure to mark your birthday with a card. Give lots of hugs to Dad and Sally and Paul from me! xoxoxo…
      And yes, we’ve really bolloxed up the oceans, and the air and so much.

  2. It hurts to know how much you miss Jimmie. I only wish I had that kind of relationship in my life. I bet others feel the same. Your new grandbaby is adorable with more hair than I had at 3. Enjoy your time off. Come visit whenever you feel like it (but the summer isn’t the best option). Sending much love.

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